Blog January 10, 2007

A dedicated blog for Customer Service in Ireland?

Customer service is a recurring theme (not only for me!) in blog land and Damien had his own experience recently with Insure.ie. Thankfully, in his case, someone from the company reads his blog and he was contacted and the issue somewhat resolved. Paul Cullen had a piece in Saturday’s Irish Times (subscription required) in which he said:

For consumers are the new powerless in our affluent society. Although wealthier than ever, their resources drain away thanks to high prices, a lack of real choice and illusory competition. Most of us are running faster than ever just to stand still and we don’t understand why. Too often, instead of good service, we get lip service or, worse, disservice; instead of clarity we get obfuscation.

How true – but what’s to be done? I for one would like to see a dedicated portal for customer service in Ireland where bloggers could post their experiences (good and bad) of customer service and try and impact on this whole area. I’d be really interested in stories of excellence as well as the horror ones because until customers raise their expectations of what is acceptable then our benchmarks will hover around the bottom of the scale. I also think that those organisations who have the contempt for customers that Cullen refers to need to see their service compared to similar comapnies who treat customers with a bit more respect.
I’ll admit up front that I’m simply not computer literate enough to organise this myself (the technical bits of this blog function through the kindness of strangers) but I’d be happy to throw in any other know how I’ve got if there are others out there who might do the technical stuff? What do you think?

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  • Kevin January 10, 2007 at 12:52 pm

    Researchers on the Joe Duffy show would just love this…

  • Simon McGarr January 10, 2007 at 2:06 pm

    The Saturday Irish Times article you refer to made me throw my hands in the air. Not at bad customer service, but at the sloppy journalism it displayed. Apart from the borderline offensiveness of appropriating Jim Larkin for a consumerist grip, it also asserted that the US has much better consumer protection legislation than Ireland. Thanks mostly to the efforts of the EU this is utterly inaccurate.
    If journalists want to have their opinion pieces taken seriously, the least we as readers could expect is that the facts they base their opinions on are correct.